Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Can I improve my eyesight?


Can I improve my eyesight?
Everyone worries about their eyesight – and we’re all resigned to the fact that as we get older, it’s only going to get worse. But could we actually improve our eyesight – simply through what we eat?

Long and short-sightedness are the problems that most of us think of when we think about how good our eyesight is, and those are affected by the length and shape of our eyeball and the thickness of our lens at the front. But at the back of our eyeball are all the light-sensitive cells – the retina – and the condition of this is essential to our eyesight.
A specialized part of the retina is called the macula - this part of the eye is responsible for central vision, and it is protected by a kind of natural sunscreen to prevent the sensitive vision cells from being damaged by the energy from blue or UV light. This natural sunscreen is made up of a yellowish ‘macular pigment’ – a mixture of three light-absorbing compounds; lutein, zeaxanthin and meso-zeaxanthin. Our bodies cannot make these three compounds – in fact they are made by plants to absorb light in order to carry out photosynthesis, by which they capture energy from the sun. So we get them from our diet.
Lutein and zeaxanthin are found commonly in dark green leafy veg such as kale and spinach, and also bell peppers, corn and saffron. Meso-zeaxanthin is generally not found in plants – it is thought to be made in our bodies from lutein (although it is also present in some fish, especially in their skins, so we may be able to take it in in our diet too).
These pigments, once we eat them, appear to be important in our vision and in helping keep the macula healthy.
Recent work, such as that by Professor John Nolan and his team at the Waterford Institute of Technology, south east Ireland, suggests that increasing the levels of these three compounds in our diet can improve our eyesight. So we put this to the test.
Experiment 1

Michael Mosley took supplements containing the three macular pigments every day for 12 weeks. He had his blood levels of the chemicals, the amount of macular pigments in his eyes, and his eyesight thoroughly tested before and after taking the pills.

Results
Overall, Michael showed an improvement in many aspects of his vision – but especially his perception of yellow/blue colours and his night vision), and increase in his macular pigment density and an increase in these compounds in his blood.
Blood levels of the chemicals

Macular pigment density



These results are similar to those seen in Prof Nolan’s large year-long study of around 100 volunteers, who all took the same supplementation and saw similar increases in their macular pigments and improvements in eyesight. To see them in this short a period of time, though, was a nice surprise!
Experiment 2

10 volunteers drank a daily green smoothie for 5 weeks for us, designed by Dr Elizabeth Johnston of Tufts University in the US. It was designed to include high levels of lutein and zeaxanthin to see whether it was possible to get a similar effect in the diet without taking supplements.

Recipe
Ingredients

  • 125g kale, cooked
  • 80ml milk, 2% with DHA
  • ½ small (6”) banana
  • 125g kiwi, cut pieces
  • 125g pineapple, chunks, canned in water
  • ½ medium apple, peeled
  • ¼ cup mint leaves, fresh (for flavouring)
  • 1 tbsp almond butter
  • ½ tsp wheat germ oil
  • ½ lime, squeezed

Method

  1. Add cooked kale, almond butter, wheat germ oil, and small amount of the liquid to a food processor or high-powered blender; blend until smooth paste forms.
  2. Add remaining ingredients (including rest of the liquid) and continue to blend until smooth.

Results
The green smoothie diet nearly doubled the volunteer’s lutein levels in their blood. Zeaxanthin levels did not increase, however, and there was not a change in the levels of macular pigments or improvements in their eyesight. This could be because these pigments take a while to get in to different tissues in the body, including the eye, so taking these foods for longer could show more of an effect. It may also be that the recipe needs tweaking to include more zeaxanthin. Supplements often contain these pigments from marigolds… but they’re not a common food!

So what should I do?
There’s good evidence now that increasing the amount of these pigment chemicals in your diet can help improve your eyesight. There is also some evidence that it may help prevent damage to your eyesight through macular degeneration. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the UK, and Prof Nolan’s group have seen evidence that boosting the macular pigments can help.

The question, then, is how best to get these compounds into our diet. The strongest evidence at the moment is around supplements containing all three of the macular compounds. However, many researchers believe that simply eating a diet rich in leafy green vegetables should be enough to keep your levels healthy. Be aware, though, that carrots – despite the myth that eating them will help your vision – do NOT contain particularly high levels of any of these compounds!
If you are at all worried about your vision, then do see an optometrist as soon as possible. Early intervention in the case of vision problems is key.
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Daily Astro News 09.28 NO HESITATION, NO COMPLAINING. YOU'RE YOUR BOSS! ...

Breaking CDC whistleblower claims agency has been using the wrong Zika test

Breaking: CDC whistleblower claims agency has been using wrong Zika test
By Erin Elizabeth - September 28, 2016


A nurse practitioner in Miami's Wynwood neighborhood gives a pregnant patient information about mosquito protection in August, after she was tested for Zika virus. The area was an active Zika transmission zone and prompted a CDC travel advisory, which has since been lifted. (Lynne Sladky/AP)
Another one bites the dust. Enter CDC whistleblower number two- wonder how many need to come forward before people stop blinding trusting this organization that DOES NOT have our best interests in mind?
As officials fight to control the dreaded Zika (which scientists from around the world say is nothing but a mild virus) the CDC once again finds itself engaged in some internal housekeeping problems, specifically, debate about the best way to test whether someone has been infected with the mosquito-borne virus.
And at the center of this issue is one of the leading experts on the Zika virus, Robert Lanciotti, chief of the CDC lab responsible for developing tests to diagnose viral diseases such as Zika that are transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas.
And as if working off a script, once Lanciotti raised concerns both inside and outside the agency about their decision to use a new test for Zika, he was demoted (in May). He argued that the test they wanted to use was less effective than another established test and missed nearly 40 percent of Zika infections. He also claimed the agency was withholding information about testing differences from state and local public health laboratories.
As you might imagine, the CDC didn’t immediately comment but his actions did prompt an internal investigation.
The Washington Post reports that the investigation found that they had acted reasonably (their own investigation, lol) by witholding the conflicting test data from state public health labs; they felt that releasing it could have created “considerable confusion during an ongoing emergency response.”
Obviously, the CDC and Lanciotti feel this testing issue is important because they are aware of how much money they can make by, sorry, because so many people need to be tested- like pregnant women. Even though Zika has never caused microcephaly before it has spontaneously started to do so- getting this test is imperative.
From the article:
“During a 2007 Zika outbreak in Micronesia, Lanciotti’s lab developed a test to detect traces of the Zika virus in a person’s blood. Called the Singleplex, it detects genetic material up to seven days after onset of illness.
When the Zika outbreak hit Brazil, this test, and another one also developed by Lanciotti’s lab to detect antibodies the body makes to fight infections, were used on samples submitted to the CDC for diagnosis.”
Because most people don’t have symptoms, figuring out if someone has become infected with Zika is very difficult. And many countries in South and Central America and the Caribbean also have dengue and chikungunya outbreaks as well. Officials worried there might be confusion.
So:
  • In March, the CDC sought emergency FDA approval to allow the new test to be distributed to state and local public health labs.
  • A day later the FDA approved emergency use of the test, Trioplex.
  • Soon after, the CDC notified public health labs about the test and began shipping it.
  • Lanciotti compared the two tests and found that Trioplex missed 39 percent of Zika infections that were detected by Singleplex.
  • An independent lab came to the same conclusion.
  • A study by the CDC lab in Puerto Rico found no difference in sensitivity.
  • Lanciotti disagreed with the decision and in mid-April, he emailed his contacts at about 30 public health laboratories.
  • The CDC notified the state labs about which tests were recommended but didn’t address the differences in performance directly.
  • In mid-May, Lanciotti emailed senior CDC leaders and asked again that the test’s lesser sensitivity be shared with public health laboratories- accusing them of deliberately withholding information.
  • A week later, Lanciotti was reassigned to a nonsupervisory position.
(He was reinstated to chief of his lab in July after he filed a whistleblower retaliation claim.)
Any of this sound like the CDC’s status quo?
The CDC’s refusal to hear their people and to be honest and transparent with the public makes them a threat to our health. If we cannot trust them to do what’s right, when they are supposedly “the top public health agency in the United States”, then who can we trust?



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Monday, September 26, 2016

Ozone Therapy Is Powerful Medicine

Ozone Therapy Is Powerful Medicine

Ozone Therapy Is Powerful Medicine 39 4 17 1 StumbleUpon 68 4 1 Google + Posted on: Friday, September 23rd 2016 at 8:00 am Written By: Valerie Burke, MSN This article is copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2016 Visit our Re-post guidelines Ozone Therapy Is Powerful Medicine This little-known therapy is being used by 40,000 physicians and dentists in more than 50 countries for everything from herniated disks to endodontic infections to Lyme disease, with no virtually adverse effects. Until the turn of the century, ozone therapy has remained somewhat of a “best kept medical secret” in North America. This is a shame because it can be a safe, cost effective and powerful boost to your health, providing relief from a variety of painful and disabling illnesses. The widespread medical use of ozone first appeared in Germany in the early 1950s and has been used extensively across Europe ever since. During World War I, it was used to treat infected wounds, but ozone was subsequently swept under the rug by the pharmaceutical industry in their push toward antibiotics. With growing numbers of bacteria now becoming resistant to antibiotics, we now have an urgent need for anti-infectives that will kill these superbugs before they can kill us. Because of ozone’s remarkable antiseptic power, its most common technological application is water purification. As a disinfectant, ozone is 1,000 times more powerful than chlorine, which is why more than 600 US cities use it in water treatment facilities. Like hyperbaric oxygen therapy, ozone therapy harnesses the healing power of oxygen. Today, 40,000 physicians and dentists in more than 50 countries use ozone therapy for everything from endodontic infections to relieving the pain of herniated disks, to reducing arterial plaque. Ozone is extraordinary in that it is simple to generate and has virtually no toxicity, making it a viable option for both treatment and prevention of illness. But Wait—Isn’t Ozone Dangerous? Yes, and no. It depends on how much you’re exposed to what it’s allowed to mix with. Allopathic physicians often caution against treatments with which they’re unfamiliar, and many warnings can be found about the “dangers” of ozone, largely arising from a lack of understanding and a good amount of recycled misinformation. Medical ozone is different from atmospheric ozone. At ground level, atmospheric ozone reacts with natural and industrial emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) in the presence of heat and sunlight, and these reactive products are unhealthy to breathe. It is not the ozone that’s hard on the lungs, but the toxic agents that form in these reactions.[1] Fortunately, you have a natural mechanism to alert you that you’re breathing in too much ozone—it’s called coughing. You will cough long before any damage occurs to your lungs. Similar to exercise, ozone is an oxidant. Ozone therapy is similar to exercise in how it creates health benefits by delivering measured doses of oxidative stress that force your body to activate its own internal antioxidant systems. The same is true for vitamin C therapy, which acts as an oxidant or antioxidant depending on the dose. Exercise strengthens your muscles by inflicting oxidative “damage,” which causes them to come back stronger in response. Similarly, blood exposed to ozone undergoes transitory oxidative stress, which is necessary to activate important biological functions without detrimental effects. Just as with exercise and high-dose vitamin C, there is a Goldilocks zone—you need enough stress to produce the effect, but not so much that it overwhelms your natural antioxidant systems. The main enzyme at play in ozone therapy is superoxide dismutase (SOD). SOD stimulates another enzyme called telomerase, responsible for keeping your DNA young by maintaining the telomere at the end of each DNA strand. A study involving individuals with herniated discs found that ozone therapy provided oxidative protection, as well as relieving pain. The truth is that therapeutic ozone has an excellent safety record and no toxic effects have been observed from proper clinical use. In fact, experienced practitioners report that ozone is much safer than prescription drugs, which kill 290 people in the US alone each day—and that’s a conservative estimate.[2] Side effects seldom occur with ozone therapy, but patients occasionally report slight weakness, dizziness or sleepiness that lasts for a short time during or after the treatment. Allergic skin reactions (like nettle rash) are possible with local applications of ozone, although these occurrences are rare, mild and quick to resolve. Where infections are involved, there is always the possibility of a die-off reaction (Herxheimer reaction), although some experts report less herxing with ozone than with other anti-infective agents. There are some contraindications. In low concentrations, ozone has a moderate hypo-coagulation effect, so drugs that decrease blood coagulation (anticoagulants, aspirin, etc.) should be discontinued during the course of ozone therapy. Ozone is probably not the best modality for those with blood coagulation failure, thrombocytopenia, or hemorrhagic or apoplectic stroke. Ozone Relieves Pain, Kills Viruses, and Is a Powerful Detox Agent The list of ozone’s therapeutic applications has grown far beyond the antiseptic properties for which it was first recognized. To date, science has suggested that ozone offers the following therapeutic benefits:[3] [4] 1.Increases circulation 2.Improves uptake and utilization of oxygen and activation of oxygen-dependent processes; maximizes oxidative and anti-oxidative processes; upregulates mitochondrial respiration and generates greater cellular energy 3.Powerful detoxification is a primary function of ozone; removal of toxins (petrochemicals included) that impair cellular respiration, energy production and nutrient absorption; stimulates metabolic processes in the liver and kidneys 4.Increases efficiency of the body’s antioxidant enzyme system 5.Immune system modulation; increases production of white blood cells, interferon, and interleukin-2; activates cellular and humoral immunity, corrects autoimmune processes 6.Fast acting anti-inflammatory: oxidizes compounds that drive the inflammatory process, regulates metabolic reactions and improves pH 7.Analgesia: oxidizes the agents that irritate nerve endings in damaged tissue, thereby mitigating the pain response 8.Anti-microbial (antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal); kills bacteria by rupturing their cell membranes 9.Anti-cancer: stimulates production of tumor necrosis factor 10.Anti-aging effects (increased production of telomerase) These properties make medical ozone therapy a safe and effective treatment for all sorts of infections, including areas of the body typically receiving poor circulation. Ozone has been shown effective for sinus and endodontic infections,[5] osteonecrosis of the jar (ONJ), ear infections, hepatitis,[6] cystitis, HIV, intestinal and blood infections, and Lyme disease. Ozone is also being used to relieve arthritis, neuropathy, degenerative joint and disk disease, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue. One of the most impressive evidence-based applications is relief from the pain of herniated disks, particularly lumbar. More than one meta-analysis found ozone treatment an effective and “extremely safe” procedure with pain and functional outcomes equal to or better than surgery, but with much lower complication rates (less than 0.1 percent) and significantly shorter recovery times.[7] [8] Dr. Robert Rowen, a leading expert in oxidative therapy, reports that ozone is about 85 percent effective for osteoarthritic knees and nearly that effective for arthritic hips when administered via injection.[9] For neuropathy, one study found a single subcutaneous injection of ozone reduced neuropathic pain and inflammation in mice.[10] Ozone therapy offers new hope for fibromyalgia sufferers—a pilot study saw improvement from the physical symptoms and depressive symptoms of fibromyalgia.[11]Posted on: Friday, September 23rd 2016 at 8:00 am
Written By: Valerie Burke, MSN
This article is copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2016

This little-known therapy is being used by 40,000 physicians and dentists in more than 50 countries for everything from herniated disks to endodontic infections to Lyme disease, with no virtually adverse effects.
Until the turn of the century, ozone therapy has remained somewhat of a “best kept medical secret” in North America. This is a shame because it can be a safe, cost effective and powerful boost to your health, providing relief from a variety of painful and disabling illnesses.
The widespread medical use of ozone first appeared in Germany in the early 1950s and has been used extensively across Europe ever since. During World War I, it was used to treat infected wounds, but ozone was subsequently swept under the rug by the pharmaceutical industry in their push toward antibiotics. With growing numbers of bacteria now becoming resistant to antibiotics, we now have an urgent need for anti-infectives that will kill these superbugs before they can kill us.
Because of ozone’s remarkable antiseptic power, its most common technological application is water purification. As a disinfectant, ozone is 1,000 times more powerful than chlorine, which is why more than 600 US cities use it in water treatment facilities.
Like hyperbaric oxygen therapy, ozone therapy harnesses the healing power of oxygen. Today, 40,000 physicians and dentists in more than 50 countries use ozone therapy for everything from endodontic infections to relieving the pain of herniated disks, to reducing arterial plaque. Ozone is extraordinary in that it is simple to generate and has virtually no toxicity, making it a viable option for both treatment and prevention of illness.
But Wait—Isn’t Ozone Dangerous?
Yes, and no. It depends on how much you’re exposed to what it’s allowed to mix with. Allopathic physicians often caution against treatments with which they’re unfamiliar, and many warnings can be found about the “dangers” of ozone, largely arising from a lack of understanding and a good amount of recycled misinformation.
Medical ozone is different from atmospheric ozone. At ground level, atmospheric ozone reacts with natural and industrial emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) in the presence of heat and sunlight, and these reactive products are unhealthy to breathe. It is not the ozone that’s hard on the lungs, but the toxic agents that form in these reactions.[1]
Fortunately, you have a natural mechanism to alert you that you’re breathing in too much ozone—it’s called coughing. You will cough long before any damage occurs to your lungs.
Similar to exercise, ozone is an oxidant. Ozone therapy is similar to exercise in how it creates health benefits by delivering measured doses of oxidative stress that force your body to activate its own internal antioxidant systems. The same is true for vitamin C therapy, which acts as an oxidant or antioxidant depending on the dose.
Exercise strengthens your muscles by inflicting oxidative “damage,” which causes them to come back stronger in response. Similarly, blood exposed to ozone undergoes transitory oxidative stress, which is necessary to activate important biological functions without detrimental effects. Just as with exercise and high-dose vitamin C, there is a Goldilocks zone—you need enough stress to produce the effect, but not so much that it overwhelms your natural antioxidant systems.
The main enzyme at play in ozone therapy is superoxide dismutase (SOD). SOD stimulates another enzyme called telomerase, responsible for keeping your DNA young by maintaining the telomere at the end of each DNA strand. A study involving individuals with herniated discs found that ozone therapy provided oxidative protection, as well as relieving pain.
The truth is that therapeutic ozone has an excellent safety record and no toxic effects have been observed from proper clinical use. In fact, experienced practitioners report that ozone is much safer than prescription drugs, which kill 290 people in the US alone each day—and that’s a conservative estimate.[2] Side effects seldom occur with ozone therapy, but patients occasionally report slight weakness, dizziness or sleepiness that lasts for a short time during or after the treatment. Allergic skin reactions (like nettle rash) are possible with local applications of ozone, although these occurrences are rare, mild and quick to resolve.
Where infections are involved, there is always the possibility of a die-off reaction (Herxheimer reaction), although some experts report less herxing with ozone than with other anti-infective agents.
There are some contraindications. In low concentrations, ozone has a moderate hypo-coagulation effect, so drugs that decrease blood coagulation (anticoagulants, aspirin, etc.) should be discontinued during the course of ozone therapy. Ozone is probably not the best modality for those with blood coagulation failure, thrombocytopenia, or hemorrhagic or apoplectic stroke.
Ozone Relieves Pain, Kills Viruses, and Is a Powerful Detox Agent
The list of ozone’s therapeutic applications has grown far beyond the antiseptic properties for which it was first recognized. To date, science has suggested that ozone offers the following therapeutic benefits:[3] [4]
1.Increases circulation
2.Improves uptake and utilization of oxygen and activation of oxygen-dependent processes; maximizes oxidative and anti-oxidative processes; upregulates mitochondrial respiration and generates greater cellular energy
3.Powerful detoxification is a primary function of ozone; removal of toxins (petrochemicals included) that impair cellular respiration, energy production and nutrient absorption; stimulates metabolic processes in the liver and kidneys
4.Increases efficiency of the body’s antioxidant enzyme system
5.Immune system modulation; increases production of white blood cells, interferon, and interleukin-2; activates cellular and humoral immunity, corrects autoimmune processes
6.Fast acting anti-inflammatory: oxidizes compounds that drive the inflammatory process, regulates metabolic reactions and improves pH
7.Analgesia: oxidizes the agents that irritate nerve endings in damaged tissue, thereby mitigating the pain response
8.Anti-microbial (antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal); kills bacteria by rupturing their cell membranes
9.Anti-cancer: stimulates production of tumor necrosis factor
10.Anti-aging effects (increased production of telomerase)
These properties make medical ozone therapy a safe and effective treatment for all sorts of infections, including areas of the body typically receiving poor circulation. Ozone has been shown effective for sinus and endodontic infections,[5] osteonecrosis of the jar (ONJ), ear infections, hepatitis,[6] cystitis, HIV, intestinal and blood infections, and Lyme disease.
Ozone is also being used to relieve arthritis, neuropathy, degenerative joint and disk disease, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue. One of the most impressive evidence-based applications is relief from the pain of herniated disks, particularly lumbar. More than one meta-analysis found ozone treatment an effective and “extremely safe” procedure with pain and functional outcomes equal to or better than surgery, but with much lower complication rates (less than 0.1 percent) and significantly shorter recovery times.[7] [8]
Dr. Robert Rowen, a leading expert in oxidative therapy, reports that ozone is about 85 percent effective for osteoarthritic knees and nearly that effective for arthritic hips when administered via injection.[9]

For neuropathy, one study found a single subcutaneous injection of ozone reduced neuropathic pain and inflammation in mice.[10] Ozone therapy offers new hope for fibromyalgia sufferers—a pilot study saw improvement from the physical symptoms and depressive symptoms of fibromyalgia.[11]
Properly administered ozone therapy also benefits your heart by improving circulation and oxygen delivery. Blood viscosity is reduced for easier cardiac pumping and improved capillary perfusion. Red blood cells are better able to deliver their oxygen into tissues, a benefit that seems to persist long after treatment is completed. Inflammation is also reduced, leading to better nitric oxide formation, which dilates and relaxes vessels and further improves blood flow. Ozone is also reported to trim down arterial plaque through oxidation.[12] [13]
There are potential benefits for macular degeneration as well, with authors writing that ozone therapy is a “safe and effective therapeutic option for high-risk patients with dry AMD.”[14] [15] For a comprehensive list of clinical studies related to the medical uses of ozone, refer to this database on Zotero.[16]
Ozone Therapy is a Gas
When you think of an enema, liquid probably comes to mind, but ozone can be delivered into any body orifice—as a gas. Ozone is actually compatible with a number of delivery vehicles:
·      mAHT (Minor Autohemotherapy): Blood is drawn into a syringe, mixed with a blend of ozone and oxygen, then returned to the body via intramuscular injection
·      MAHT (Major Autohemotherapy): Blood is withdrawn intravenously from the patient, mixed with ozone and a small amount of anticoagulant, then returned to the body intravenously
·      Prolozone Therapy: Ozone is injected directly into tissues; proponents claim it can produce an immediate and permanent fix for problems such as back pain and herniated disks, plantar fasciitis, TMJ, sciatica, osteoarthritis, tennis elbow and other sports injuries[17]
·      Gas Irrigation for Wound Treatment: Affected body parts, such as limbs, can be wrapped in plastic bags for sustained exposure to ozone gas
·      Rectal or Vaginal Insufflation (Gas Irrigation): Similar to an enema, a gaseous mixture of oxygen and ozone is infused
·      Nasal or Ear Insufflation
·      Ozonated Water: Studies point to potential anti-inflammatory effects from drinking ozonated water[18]
·      Ozonated Oils: Ozone can be stabilized and trapped between the double bonds of a PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acid), and then the oil applied topically[19] [20]
·      Ozone Sauna: Steam saunas that include ozone promote deep detoxification of all the major organs and tissues of the body, including the lymphatic system
Dr. Rowen recommends MAHT for acute infections and for resistant chronic infections such as Lyme and its coconspirators. However, for many chronic conditions rectal insufflation is highly effective and less invasive. Because it’s a gas, ozone can migrate through tissues, making it possible for it to diffuse into less accessible areas of the body when injected into nearby tissues that are easier to access.
Some physicians are combining ozone therapy with its “sister” oxidative therapy, UBI (ultraviolet blood irradiation) in a method similar to MAHT. UBI has a very powerful study behind it, published in the prestigious American Journal of Surgery way back in 1947. The study details 445 cases of acute pyogenic (bacterial) infection with virtually 100 percent cure. Even those who were gravely ill and facing imminent death had a 50 percent cure rate.[21] Dr. Rowen recently published an article about UBI in which he writes:[22]
With the recent emergence of bacteria that are resistant to all known antibiotics, UBI should be more investigated as an alternative approach to infections, and as an immune-modulating therapy.
For More Information
Ozone is an underutilized therapy that is useful both as a treatment and as a preventative due to its powerful detoxification and healing properties, with negligible risk. It’s generally less expensive than other treatments, although accessibility remains somewhat limited in certain geographic areas.
Further information about ozone is available from the American Academy of Ozonotherapy (AAOT). The practitioner-finder on their site can help you locate a qualified practitioner in your area.





[1] Bocci V. Ozone: A New Medical Drug, Springer; 2nd edition, October 13, 2010; 315 pp ISBN-10: 9048192331 ISBN-13: 978-9048192335

[2] Starfield B. “Is US Health Really the Best in the World? “JAMA. 2000;284(4):483-485. doi:10.1001/jama.284.4.483

[3] Elvis AM and Ekta JS “Ozone therapy: A clinical review” J Nat Sci Biol Med. 2011 Jan-Jun;2(1):66-70 doi: 10.4103/0976-9668.82319 PMCID: PMC3312702


[5] Mohammadi Z et al. “A review of the properties and applications of ozone in endodontics: an update” Iran Ended J. 2013 Spring;8(2):40-3. Epub 2013 May 1. PMID: 23717326 PMCID: PMC3662033

[6] Zaky S et al. “Preliminary results of ozone therapy as a possible treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C” J Altern Complement Med. 2011 Mar;17(3):259-63. PMID: 21417811 DOI: 10.1089/acm.2010.0016

[7] Magalhaes FN et al. “Ozone therapy as a treatment for low back pain secondary to herniated disc: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials” Pain Physician 2012 Mar-Apr;15(2):E115-29 PMID: 22430658

[8] Andreula CF et al. “Minimally Invasive Oxygen-Ozone Therapy for Lumbar Disk Herniation” AJNR 2003 24: 996-1000


[10] Fuccio C et al. “A single subcutaneous injection of ozone prevents allodynia and decreases the over-expression of pro-inflammatory caspases in the orbito-frontal cortex of neuropathic mice” Eur J Pharmacol. 2009 Jan 28;603(1-3):42-9 PMID: 19100257 DOI: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2008.11.060

[11] Hidalgo-Tallon J et al. “Ozone therapy as add-on treatment in fibromyalgia management by rectal insufflation: an open-label pilot study” J Altern Complement Med. 2013 Mar;19(3):238-42 PMID: 23046293 DOI: 10.1089/acm.2011.0739

[12] Bocci V et al. “May oxygen-ozone therapy improves cardiovascular disorders?” Cardiovasc Heamatol Disord Drug Targets 2009 Jun;9(2):78-85 PMID: 19519366

[13] Martinez-Sanchez G et al. “Effects of ozone therapy on haemostatic and oxidative stress index in coronary artery diseaseEuro J Pharmacol. 15 Sept 2012;691 (1-3):156-162

[14] Borreli E et al. “Effects of major ozonated autohemotherapy in the treatment of dry age related macular degeneration: a randomized controlled clinical study” Int J Opthalmol. 2012; 5(6): 708–713. doi:  10.3980/j.issn.2222-3959.2012.06.11 PMCID: PMC3530813

[15] Borreli E and Bocci V. “Visual Improvement Following Ozonetherapy in Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration; a ReviewMed Hypothesis Discov Innov Ophthalmol. 2013 Summer; 2(2): 47–51. PMCID: PMC3939750

[16] ISCO3 Ozone Zotero.org Research database

[17] Rowen R. “Knee, Back, and Shoulder Pain Cured With ProlozoneFoundation for Alternative and Integrative Medicine (Originally published in Dr. Robert Rowen's Second Opinion Newsletter, Vol. XXI, Issue 5, May 2011)

[18] Azuma K et al. “Anti-inflammatory effects of ozonated water in an experimental mouse model” Biomed Rep. 2014 Sep; 2(5): 671–674 doi: 10.3892/br.2014.290 PMCID: PMC4106612

[19] Travagli V et al. “Ozone and ozonated oils in skin diseases: a review” Mediators Inflamm. 2010;2010:610418 PMID: 20671923 PMCID: PMC2910505 DOI: 10.1155/2010/610418

[20] Valacchi G et al. “The dual action of ozone on the skin” Br J Dermatol. 2005 Dec;153(6):1096-100 PMID: 16307642 DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2005.06939.x

[21] Miley G and Christensen JA. “Ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy” April 1947;73(4):486-492 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0002-9610(47)90330-9

[22] Wu X. et al. “Ultraviolet blood irradiation: Is it time to remember ‘the cure that time forgot’?” J Photochem Photobiol B. 2016 Apr;157:89-96. PMID: 26894849 PMCID: PMC4783265 DOI: 10.1016/j.jphotobiol.2016.02.007

Resistant Starch Good for your Microbiome

helps our hormonal balance
06/25/15


Resistant starch (RS) is a type of carbohydrate that our digestive enzymes cannot break down in the stomach or small intestine. They therefore reach the colon intact, “resisting” digestion.
This explains why we do not see spikes in either blood glucose or insulin after eating food rich in RS and why we do not obtain significant calories from RS.
I feel like RS is an overlooked area of repairing our gut. In my practice, more and more clients incorporate RS into their diets and get wonderful results – especially those struggling with digestive issues and chronic case of candida overgrowth.
The key benefit is simple: RS is food for probiotics (whether you take them in the form of a pill or in food – I’m a proponent of doing both). In other words, it’s a prebiotic we often hear about. I’ve found the often cited prebiotics in the form of inulin, artichoke, etc. to be problematic for many people, especially those with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) and leaky gut. It’s no surprise because many prebiotics are high on FODMAPs whereby food rich in RS is not.

The role of the gut in hormonal balance
Many people wonder why I go on and on about the health of our digestion when we struggle with hormonal issues. I completely understand – the connection may not be clear right away.
In short: there are three main reasons.
The first is that chronic digestive issues such as constipation, loose stools, bloating, acid reflux, and indigestion are perceived as stress, and additional cortisol (stress hormone) is produced to help deal with the digestive stress. When this is on top of all the other adversities many of us need to deal with on a daily basis, digestive issues can further worsen adrenal exhaustion.
The second reason is that 70% of serotonin is produced in the gut and serotonin has an upregulating function of other hormones including estrogen and progesterone (source).
The third and most recently discovered reason is the role of the estrobolome – a subset of gut bacteria that helps with the metabolism of estrogens, especially the dangerous estrogen metabolites responsible for breast, ovarian and thyroid cancers (source).
This is where RS comes in. Many of us already take probiotics and/or eat a cup of fermented foods daily to heal our digestion or to maintain good health. RS-rich food can further help by colonizing the gut with the good bacteria in a consistent and effective manner.
From my personal experience and the journey of many women I’ve worked with, I see faster healing happen when RS-rich foods are added. This applies to healing of the GI lining as well as clearing the body of candida (which 70% of women I work with suffer from).

Resistant starch and butyrate = less inflammation
One of the key benefits of RS is butyrate production which happens as a result of the fermentation in the gut.
Butyrate is the preferred energy source of the cells lining the colon and it also plays a number of roles in increasing metabolism, decreasing inflammation and improving stress resistance (source).
Butyrate is also a powerful anti-inflammatory agent for the colon and functions to improve the integrity of our gut by decreasing intestinal permeability and therefore keeping toxins in the gut and out of the bloodstream.
If you experience GI distress (such as discomfort, gas and bloating) with even small amounts of RS, this may be an indication of SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) or some other form of microbial dysbiosis.

I’ve done lots of research on this as there is contradictory and incomplete information out there and I’ve found Chris Kresser’s article to be most comprehensive and well researched.
Here is the scoop, from his blog:
“There are four types of resistant starch:
RS Type 1: Starch is physically inaccessible, bound within the fibrous cell walls of plants. This is found in grains, seeds, and legumes.
RS Type 2: Starch with a high amylose content, which is indigestible in the raw state. This is found in potatoes, green (unripe) bananas, and plantains. Cooking these foods causes changes in the starch making it digestible to us, and removing the resistant starch.
RS Type 3: Also called retrograde RS since this type of RS forms after Type 1 or Type 2 RS is cooked and then cooled. These cooked and cooled foods can be reheated at low temperatures, less than 130 degrees and maintain the benefits of RS (6).
Heating at higher temperatures will again convert the starch into a form that is digestible to us rather than “feeding” our gut bacteria.
Examples include cooked and cooled parboiled rice, cooked and cooled potatoes, and cooked and cooled properly-prepared (soaked or sprouted) legumes.
RS Type 4: This is a synthetic form of RS that I’m including for completeness, but would not recommend. A common example is “hi-maize resistant starch.”
Bob’s Red Mill Unmodified Potato Starch (NOT potato flour) is one of the best sources of RS with approximately eight grams of RS in one tablespoon.

Benefits of resistant starch
And there are many:
  • Feeds “good” bacteria responsible for butyrate production. This applies to the bifido and bacillus bacteria which many people are deficient in. People who were not breastfed have a tendency to be low in bifidobacterium so RS gives a wonderful opportunity to colonize our gut with the good guys.
  • May preferentially bind to and expel “bad” bacteria – this explains why people with candida do very well on RS.
  • Improves insulin sensitivity – this is especially important for women with sugar fluctuations and PCOS (but not only).
  • Improves the integrity and function of the gut.
  • Reduces fasting blood sugar. This is one of the most commonly mentioned benefits of RS, and the research seems to back it up.
  • Increases satiety.

What about potatoes as nightshades and beans?
Yes, nightshades can be a problem for some people, especially those with rheumatoid arthritis and chronic body pains and aches. I have found that many people who can’t eat potatoes, do not react to the unmodified potato starch. I would therefore encourage you to try it. As always, go slow when introducing any new food, starting with ¼ of a teaspoon before you build it up.
I am reluctant to recommend beans and legumes. When cooked, they contain RS as well but I find that most people are having lots of difficulties digesting them, even when soaked and sprouted.

How to add RS-rich food to your diet?
Here are a few of my recommendations:
  • Green plantain flour – since it can’t be heated in order to retain RS, the easiest thing to do is to add it to your morning smoothie. Its “chalky” texture might feel a little strange when dissolved in water but it blends really well into a smoothie.
  • Cold potato salad – see my new recipe that goes back to my Eastern European roots and also incorporates sauerkraut. So, a prebiotic and a probiotic in one meal.
  • Rice salads – any cold rice salad would be a good addition. Cold sushi will also do the trick.

Unfortunately, I’ve found that plantains cannot be heated and cooled to get the same RS effect as potatoes, rice and beans. Bummer.
As always, start adding RS-rich food slowly and build up.

In health and happiness.

Sunday, September 25, 2016

Scientists Find Root That Kills 98% Of Cancer Cells In Only 48 Hours dandelion


Scientists Find Root That Kills 98% Of Cancer Cells In Only 48 Hours
Marilyn Caylor
9/21/2016











  • Dandelion has been used medicinally since ancient times for its various health benefits. However, the most powerful benefit to come out of this common weed is something that medical researchers are super excited to have "discovered" - which is its potential to cure cancer!








  • This potent root builds up blood and immune system- cures prostate, lung, and other cancers better than chemotherapy. According to Dr. Carolyn Hamm from the Windsor Regional Cancer Centre in Ontario, Canada, dandelion root extract was the only thing that helped with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. This form of cancer typically affects older adults.
    John Di Carlo, who at the time was a 72-year old cancer patient at the hospital, was sent home to live out his final days after all efforts failed to treat his leukemia. He told CBC News that he was advised to drink dandelion root tea as a last ditch effort. Perhaps it should have been the first option offered in his treatment plan, as his cancer went into remission only four months later! His doctors attributed this to the dandelion tea that he drank.








    Recent studies have shown that dandelion root extract can work very quickly on cancer cells, as was evidenced in Di Carlo's case. Within 48 hours of coming into contact with the extract, cancerous cells begin to disintegrate. The body happily replaces these with healthy new cells.
    Further studies have concluded that the extract also has anti-cancer benefits for other types of cancer, including breast, colon, prostate, liver, and lung cancer! Dandelion root tea may not taste as pleasant as other teas, but it's certainly more pleasant than living with the side effects of chemotherapy or radiation treatments.
    Traditional cancer therapies harm the immune system by killing all cells, even the healthy ones. Dandelion root has the opposite effect - it actually helps boost your immune system and only targets the unhealthy cells. It's definitely a win-win situation!
    Dr. Hamm warns, however, that dandelion root extract can negatively impact the effects of chemotherapy. It's always best to consult with your doctor, and let them know any and all supplements or foods that you are consuming on a regular basis.

    Even if you don't have cancer, eating the greens or drinking dandelion tea can still give you great health! For example, the roots and stems of dandelion can help fight diabetes. It does this by stimulating the pancreas to produce insulin, which in turn stabilizes the spikes in blood sugar levels.
    If you suffer from digestive issues or need to get rid of toxins, dandelion tea may be just what the herbal medicine doctor ordered! The liver aids the digestive system by producing bile, and it also filters the blood of chemicals and other impurities. According to Dr. Axe, the vitamins and minerals found in dandelions can help cleanse the liver and keep it in tip top shape. So by supporting your liver, you are actually creating better health!

    Dandelions are also high in antioxidants and vitamin C, which is crucial to helping your body fight off infections, such as the bacteria that cause urinary tract infections. If you suffer from frequent bouts of UTI, drinking dandelion tea on a daily basis may prevent it from happening ever again.
    Dandelion greens are bitter, but completely edible - as long as you get it from an area that hasn't been sprayed with chemicals. The greens are rich in fiber, which is great for intestinal health! High fiber diets have also been shown to reduce the risk of obesity, heart disease, and irritable bowel syndrome.
    The greens are also high in vitamin A - just one cup contains 100% of your recommended daily allowance. Vitamin A is critical for maintaining healthy vision, and it can also prevent premature aging of the skin.
    Since you probably aren't likely to eat an entire cup of bitter greens on its own, you can incorporate it into a morning smoothie. Just blend it up with your favorite fruit, which will offset the bitter taste.


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    Watch the video below to find out how to make fresh dandelion tea from scratch!

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    Wow - who knew there were so many health benefits to a "weed" that's growing out in my front yard? Its ability to cure cancer has me in complete awe!